nevver:

Journey to the Center of the Earth
16.04.14
819
(via A Floating Sound Orb Transmits the Past to the Future)
10.04.14
2

nevver:

Vanishing point, Luca Zanier

(Source: zanier.ch)

08.04.14

winkbooks:

A mapped guidebook to the underground city of Hong Kong

Cities Without Ground
by Jonathan Solomon, Clara Wong, and Adam Frampton
ORO Editions
2012, 128 pages, 5.6 x 7.8 x 0.4
$15 Buy a copy on Amazon

A small book, but unlike any other. It maps the underground city inside of Hong Kong. Beneath and between the gleaming skyscrapers built over the cramped confines of Hong Kong proper are miles of subterranean malls, passageways, stairs, subway stations, parking garages, escalators, skybridges, and food courts. This “city without ground” forms a shadow city with its own civic ecology. One can walk for hours without leaving this interior place. This large vernacular space was mapped by architectural students in insane detail. Those diagrams are reproduced here. But there are only a few photos of the places or people; the book is primarily diagrams and maps of this inadvertent terrain, one that was engineered but never designed. The 122-page book was created as a guidebook in sufficient detail to guide you through this unappreciated maze town. – Kevin Kelly

(Source: winkbooks)

07.04.14
142
As part of the NYPL project, you can use the Map Warper to place any of the digitized documents over Google Earth and see just what is really in the ground beneath your feet beyond the sidewalks and subways. (via A 19th Century Map of the Geology Hidden Beneath the NYC Streets)

As part of the NYPL project, you can use the Map Warper to place any of the digitized documents over Google Earth and see just what is really in the ground beneath your feet beyond the sidewalks and subways. (via A 19th Century Map of the Geology Hidden Beneath the NYC Streets)

07.04.14
4
rhubarbes:

Carrly Tunnel by Roof Topper (via 500px / Carrly Tunnel by Roof Topper)

rhubarbes:

Carrly Tunnel by Roof Topper (via 500px / Carrly Tunnel by Roof Topper)

(via sekigan)

07.04.14
181
A small cottage in the Edinburgh suburb of Gilmerton hides the entrance to an unusual mystery. Buried in the sandstone underneath the town’s homes are a series of tunnels known as Gilmerton Cove. They are obviously man-made—on top of the building-like layout, there are benches, seats, and stairs carved from the stone—yet no one has any real idea who built them, when, or why. A popular explanation, first recorded in 1769, is that the tunnel system was carved by a blacksmith named George Paterson between 1719 and 1724. The idea is that it was a home and workshop, but there are good reasons to doubt this. The area supposedly identified as a fireplace has no blackening around it, suggesting nothing has ever been burned there. There exists what appears to be a well, but it never went deep enough to hit water. Another possibility is that it was dug in the 17th century as a “trial bore” to search for coal. There are some tunnels heading north that are blocked but may once have reached the nearby Craigmillar Castle, suggesting that the cove could have been an escape tunnel. Some of the wilder suggestions include the idea that it was used as a hideaway by witches facing persecution. (via 10 Fascinating Unsolved Mysteries From Scotland - Listverse)

A small cottage in the Edinburgh suburb of Gilmerton hides the entrance to an unusual mystery. Buried in the sandstone underneath the town’s homes are a series of tunnels known as Gilmerton Cove. They are obviously man-made—on top of the building-like layout, there are benches, seats, and stairs carved from the stone—yet no one has any real idea who built them, when, or why. A popular explanation, first recorded in 1769, is that the tunnel system was carved by a blacksmith named George Paterson between 1719 and 1724. The idea is that it was a home and workshop, but there are good reasons to doubt this. The area supposedly identified as a fireplace has no blackening around it, suggesting nothing has ever been burned there. There exists what appears to be a well, but it never went deep enough to hit water. Another possibility is that it was dug in the 17th century as a “trial bore” to search for coal. There are some tunnels heading north that are blocked but may once have reached the nearby Craigmillar Castle, suggesting that the cove could have been an escape tunnel. Some of the wilder suggestions include the idea that it was used as a hideaway by witches facing persecution. (via 10 Fascinating Unsolved Mysteries From Scotland - Listverse)

03.04.14
4
(via 10 Strange And Obscure Secret Societies - Listverse)
03.04.14
1

(Source: kav-k, via sekigan)

02.04.14
347

Bigger Than Life - Ice Caves

(Source: vimeo.com)

01.04.14
nevver:

Joseph Campbell
28.03.14
58. There’s a 150-foot-deep hole (15 stories) on Park Avenue between 36th and 37th streets.
21.03.14
3
50. From 1904 to 1948 there was an 18th Street station on the 4/5/6 line. It’s abandoned now, but you can still see it on local 6 trains.
21.03.14
(via 10 Scary Holes With Deadly Pasts - Listverse)
21.03.14
1
10 Haunted Tunnels With Really Creepy Backstories
11.03.14
2